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Why You'll Never Buy the Perfect Ring (and Other Valentine's Day Stories),Customer Reviews

 · September 21, • Judy, Lyn and Donna Ulrich were driving to a volleyball game when their Ford Pinto was hit from behind by a Chevy van. The Pinto caught fire, and the Missing: online dating  · In the United States, we often praise people with strong convictions, and look down on those who express doubt or hesitation. In this favorite episode, psychologist Adam Missing: online dating  · Hidden brain online dating - How to get a good man. It is not easy for women to find a good man, and to be honest it is not easy for a man to find a good woman. Is the AdDating Has Never Been Easier! All The Options are Waiting For You in One Place. Compare Big Range of Dating Sites Today. Find Your Perfect Match Online Now!Date in Your Area · Dating Sites Comparison · Start Dating Online!Zoosk - Best Dating Site - $/month ... read more

We like to think that all humans are born with the same core emotions: anger, fear, joy, sadness and disgust. But what if that's not true? This week, psychologist Batja Mesquita offers a different model of emotions — one that can help us to better understand our own feelings and those of the people around us. All of us want to feel safe in our daily lives. Yet when we think about crime, our first response is often a blanket approach: find the bad guys, and punish them. But what if there were another way?

This week on the show, researchers Sara Heller and Chris Blattman explore how technology and psychology can be used to radically transform our approach to crime. In the United States, we often praise people with strong convictions, and look down on those who express doubt or hesitation. In this favorite episode, psychologist Adam Grant pushes back against the benefits of certainty and describes the magic that unfolds when we challenge our own deeply-held beliefs. The pressure.

The expectations. The anxiety. Some challenges can feel insurmountable. But psychologist Emily Balcetis says the solutions are often right in front of our eyes.

This week, as part of our annual series on personal growth and reinvention, we revisit a favorite conversation about how we can harness our sight to achieve our goals. How well do we know ourselves? Maybe the better question to ask is how well can we truly know ourselves?

Psychologist Tim Wilson says introspection only gets us so far, and that we often make important decisions in life and love for reasons we don't even realize.

But he says there are some simple ways to improve our self-knowledge. This podcast discusses important topics that affect us as individuals and as a society. Shankar Vedantam. Maggie Penman. It's almost Valentine's Day, but this week we're not talking about love.

Instead, we explore the other forces that drive our romantic relationships. Anne Bowers wanted her boyfriend to buy her a used ring. Second-hand engagement rings are hundreds or even thousands of dollars less expensive than new ones. But when it came time for him to propose, her husband went for a new ring.

He said he just couldn't buy a second-hand ring. Anne Bowers, a sociologist, recently conducted a study showing that many people behave exactly like her husband. She presented people with three scenarios describing identical rings that came from different sources—a store, a happy marriage, and a divorce. She found people were much less willing to pay for engagement rings that were "tainted" by a previous owner in a failed relationship.

This wasn't a hidden bias, either. Like her husband, people knew it was irrational to pay hundreds of dollars more for a ring with identical cut, color, clarity, and carats—but they did it anyway.

This week, Shankar also chats with Morning Editions' David Greene about research showing that matchmakers are happier than the rest of us. And that it's the matchmaking that makes them happier. Daniel Pink returns for another round of Stopwatch Science with more research on dating and mating.

Finally, we're joined by Meshelle, the indie-mom of comedy, for a game we call "Mad Scientist. They had an undercover researcher approach women on the street and ask them for their phone number.

Shankar Vedantam. Maggie Penman. It's almost Valentine's Day, but this week we're not talking about love. Instead, we explore the other forces that drive our romantic relationships. Anne Bowers wanted her boyfriend to buy her a used ring. Second-hand engagement rings are hundreds or even thousands of dollars less expensive than new ones. But when it came time for him to propose, her husband went for a new ring.

He said he just couldn't buy a second-hand ring. Anne Bowers, a sociologist, recently conducted a study showing that many people behave exactly like her husband. She presented people with three scenarios describing identical rings that came from different sources—a store, a happy marriage, and a divorce. She found people were much less willing to pay for engagement rings that were "tainted" by a previous owner in a failed relationship.

This wasn't a hidden bias, either. Like her husband, people knew it was irrational to pay hundreds of dollars more for a ring with identical cut, color, clarity, and carats—but they did it anyway. This week, Shankar also chats with Morning Editions' David Greene about research showing that matchmakers are happier than the rest of us.

And that it's the matchmaking that makes them happier. Daniel Pink returns for another round of Stopwatch Science with more research on dating and mating.

Finally, we're joined by Meshelle, the indie-mom of comedy, for a game we call "Mad Scientist. They had an undercover researcher approach women on the street and ask them for their phone number.

When he approaches some women, he's carrying a guitar case. When he goes up to others, he's carrying a gym bag. Can you guess when women were more likely to give him their digits? If you like spoilers, you can read the study here.

The Hidden Brain Podcast is hosted by Shankar Vedantam and produced by Kara McGuirk-Alison, Maggie Penman and Max Nesterak. To subscribe to our newsletter, click here. You can also f ollow us on Twitter hiddenbrain , karamcguirk , maggiepenman and maxnesterak , and listen for Hidden Brain stories every week on your local public radio station. Accessibility links Skip to main content Keyboard shortcuts for audio player. NPR Shop. Tiny Desk NowPlaying All Songs Considered Music Features Live Sessions.

About NPR Diversity Organization Support Careers Connect Press Ethics. Dating and Mating Hidden Brain It's almost Valentine's Day, but this week we're not talking about love. Why You'll Never Buy the Perfect Ring and Other Valentine's Day Stories. Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email. February 9, AM ET. Why You'll Never Buy the Perfect Ring and Other Valentine's Day Stories Listen · Enlarge this image.

Hidden Brain Dating and Mating Episode Dating and Mating Listen · hidden brain podcast Weddings valentine's day love dating.

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 · In the United States, we often praise people with strong convictions, and look down on those who express doubt or hesitation. In this favorite episode, psychologist Adam Missing: online dating AdDating Has Never Been Easier! All The Options are Waiting For You in One Place. Compare Big Range of Dating Sites Today. Find Your Perfect Match Online Now!Date in Your Area · Dating Sites Comparison · Start Dating Online!Zoosk - Best Dating Site - $/month  · September 21, • Judy, Lyn and Donna Ulrich were driving to a volleyball game when their Ford Pinto was hit from behind by a Chevy van. The Pinto caught fire, and the Missing: online dating  · Hidden brain online dating - How to get a good man. It is not easy for women to find a good man, and to be honest it is not easy for a man to find a good woman. Is the ... read more

Physician and healthcare executive Vivian Lee explains the psychological and economic incentives embedded in the American model of medicine, and makes the case for a different way forward. We explore the contradictions in Jefferson's life — and how those contradictions might resonate in our own lives. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain 's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships. No matter how hard you try to get happier, you end up back where you started. In the United States, we often praise people with strong convictions, and look down on those who express doubt or hesitation.

Instead, we explore the other forces that drive our romantic relationships. July 6, • Not long after his sixteenth birthday, Fred Clay was arrested for the murder of a cab driver in Boston, hidden brain online dating. You Might Also Like. September 28, • If you listen closely to giggles, guffaws, and polite chuckles, you can discern a huge amount of information about people and their relationships with each other. AUG 29, You 2. At seventeen years old, Fred Clay was sentenced hidden brain online dating prison for a crime he did not commit. Slaying The 'Fee-for-Service Monster' Of American Healthcare Listen ·

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